It’s a misconception that Alzheimer’s is a natural part of ageing …

Healthy lifestyle
Have you wondered what risk factors could potentially increase the chance of developing Alzheimer’s? I’m sure you have, as I get asked this question all the time, once people know my research area is Alzheimer’s disease!

While we know there are certain genes that may increase the likelihood of developing Alzheimer’s, we also know that positive lifestyle choices may help reduce the risk. Although we can’t change our genes, we can potentially change they way they are expressed through our lifestyle choices. We should be making sure we get enough cardiovascular exercise, maintain a normal blood pressure, and try to eat a Mediterranean-style diet rich in antioxidants and good fats, for example.

I’ve listed the main known contenders below that have been scientifically identified to increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s. Explore each risk factor to learn more about the science and how you can potentially influence these factors to reduce your own risk. Risk management is after all about identifying risk and then developing strategies to reduce it. As the old proverb goes, ‘prevention is better than cure’.

Advancing Age

HOW TO REDUCE YOUR RISK

Family history

HOW TO REDUCE YOUR RISK

Genetics

HOW TO REDUCE YOUR RISK

Cardiovascular disease

HOW TO REDUCE YOUR RISK

Diabetes

HOW TO REDUCE YOUR RISK

High cholesterol

HOW TO REDUCE YOUR RISK

Head trauma

HOW TO REDUCE YOUR RISK

Environmental

HOW TO REDUCE YOUR RISK
Alzheimer’s doesn’t have to be your brain’s destiny, says neuroscientist and author of “Still Alice,” Lisa Genova. She shares the latest science investigating the disease – and some promising research on what each of us can do to build an Alzheimer’s-resistant brain.

The Alzheimer’s Society has put together an excellent brochure that outlines helpful ways to reduce your dementia risk. Download your free copy now.